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Thread: The Real First World War

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    Default The Real First World War

    Forget World War 1, history's greatest genocide was ...

    Europe’s “Great War” of 1914-1918 does not deserve to be called the “First World War.” That title should go to the first real global conflict, Europe’s genocidal invasion of other regions that began in the final decade of the 15th Century. European historians have sought to downplay the ferocity, extent and significance of that earlier conflict by treating it as a diffuse historical process, but if we who were victims accept that view it disables our understanding of everything that has happened since then.

    As few Indians are likely to know much about what actually happened, let me recount some salient points.

    A decade after Columbus landed on Hispaniola in 1492, its indigenous people were extinct. They had done nothing to deserve that fate; Columbus in a letter to his royal sponsors in Spain said they were “loving, uncovetous people,” with “good features and beautiful eyes,” who “neither carried weapons nor understood the use of such things.” Yet many were tortured to death in a vain attempt to get them to reveal non-existent hoards of gold and others worked to death or driven to suicide. Such gratuitous violence continued as Europeans extended their domains in the “New World.”

    Many of the smaller tribes followed the Arawak of Hispaniola into extinction while the populations of larger groups fell by as much as 85 percent, victims not only of indiscriminate violence but of induced famines and new diseases to which they had no immunity. The spread of smallpox through blankets distributed free to Native Americans and the wanton slaughter of the great herds of bison on which the “Plains Indians” depended for food, clothing and shelter were the most outrageous cases of genocide. Estimates of the numbers killed range up to 100 million.

    In South America, the Conquistadores engaged in a zestful mass murder that has no equivalent to this day. Bartolomeo de las Casas (1484-1566), a Spaniard who went to the New World for fortune but was driven by the atrocities he witnessed to enter the Church, left a vivid description in Brevissima Relacion de la Destruycion de la Indias (Short Report on the Destruction of the Indies):

    “One time the Indians came to meet us, and to receive us with victuals and delicate cheer, and with all entertainment, ten leagues from a great city, and being come at the place they presented us with a great quantity of fish and of bread, and other meat, together with all they could do for us to the uttermost.” The Conquistadores put them all to the sword “without any cause whatsoever,” more than “three thousand souls, which were set before us, men, women and children,” committing “great cruelties that never any man living either have or shall see the like.”

    “The Christians, with their horses and swords and lances, began to slaughter and practice strange cruelty among them. They penetrated into the country and spared neither children nor the aged, nor pregnant women, nor those in child labor, all of whom they ran through the body and lacerated, as though they were assaulting so many lambs herded in their sheepfold. They made bets as to who would slit a man in two, or cut off his head at one blow: or they opened up his bowels. They tore babes from their mothers’ breast by the feet, and dashed their heads against the rocks. Others they seized by the shoulders and threw into the rivers, laughing and joking … They spitted the bodies of other babes, together with their mothers and all who were before them, on their swords. They made a gallows just high enough for the feet to nearly touch the ground, and by thirteens, in honor and reverence of our Redeemer and the twelve Apostles, they put wood underneath and burned the Indians alive. They wrapped the bodies of others entirely in dry straw, binding them in it and setting fire to it; and so they burned them. They cut off the hands of all they wished to take alive. They generally killed the lords and nobles in the following way. They made wooden gridirons of stakes, bound them upon them, and made a slow fire beneath: thus the victims gave up the spirit by degrees, emitting cries of despair in their torture.”

    Casas, writing as the Bishop of Chiapas, estimated that just in the Caribbean his compatriots had killed some 15 million Indians, leaving “destroyed and depopulated” the large islands of Cuba, San Juan [Puerto Rico], and Jamaica, and some 30 smaller islands.

    read more: http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-rea...ld-war/5395497

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    Default Native American disease and epidemics

    By the power invested in me as Aslan the Lion, King of the Jungle (disambiguation, The Zen Zone), I hearby dub DDutton, the Al Sharpton of the Zen Zone.

    * * * * *

    Native American disease and epidemics

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Native American disease and epidemics pervade many aspects of Native American life, both throughout history and in the modern day. Diseases and epidemics can be chronicled from centuries ago when European settlers brought diseases that devastated entire tribes to the modern day when Native Americans face serious struggles with particular diseases. The current crises in diseases and epidemics are addressed by many different groups, both governmental and independent, through a multitude of programs.

    Origins of Native American Disease


    Native Americans have been affected by the disease and health concerns throughout their history, but a major turning point in Native American disease presence was with the arrival of Europeans. This ushered in what is termed the Columbian Exchange. During this period European settlers brought many different technologies and lifestyles with them, but the most harmful effects of this exchange was the arrival and spread of disease.[1]

    Native Americans, due to the lack of prior contact with Europeans, had not previously been exposed to the diseases that were prevalent on the distant continent. Therefore they had not built up internal immunities to the diseases or formed any medicines to combat them. Europeans came into the New World bearing various diseases. Those infected with diseases either possessed them in a dormant state or were not quarantined in such a way that distanced them enough from Native Americans to not spread the diseases, allowing diseases to spread into epidemics.[2]

    The diseases brought by Europeans are not easily tracked, because there were numerous outbreaks and all were not equally recorded. The most notable disease brought by Europeans was the destructive smallpox disease. The Lakota Indians called this disease the running face sickness.[3] Smallpox was lethal to many Native Americans, bringing sweeping epidemics and affecting the same tribes repeatedly. Within 1837 to 1870, at least four different epidemics struck the Plains tribes.[4] When the plains Indians began to learn of the "white man’s diseases" they began to intentionally avoid contact with the whites and their things. But many tribes enamored with the white man’s things, like metal pots, skillets and knives traded with the whites anyway, and inadvertently spread disease to their villages.[5]

    Numerous other diseases were brought to Native American tribes, including measles, scarlet fever, typhoid, typhus, influenza, pertussis (whooping cough), tuberculosis, cholera, diphtheria, chickenpox and sexually transmitted diseases.[4] Each of these diseases brought destruction through sweeping epidemics, involving illness and extensive death. Many Native American tribes experienced extensive depopulation, averaging 25–50 percent of tribal life lost due to disease. Additionally, singular tribes also neared extinction after facing severely destructive spread of disease.[4] The significant toll that this took on Native populations is expounded upon in the article Population history of indigenous peoples of the Americas. A specific example of this devastation was Cortes' invasion of Mexico. Before his arrival, the Mexican population was estimated to have been around 25-30 million. Fifty years after his arrival, the Mexican population was cut down to 3 million, attributable mainly to infectious disease. Here we see the main effect of the arrival of Europeans in the new world. With no natural immunity to help them in their fight against these pathogens, the native Americans died in huge numbers. The eminent Yale historian David Brion Davis says this was "the greatest genocide in the history of man. “Yet it's increasingly clear that most of the carnage had nothing to do with European barbarism. The worst of the suffering was caused not by swords or guns but by germs”.[6]

    Certain cultural and biological traits made Native Americans more susceptible to these diseases. Emphasis placed on visiting the sick led to the spread of disease through consistent contact.[7] Smallpox specifically led indirectly to higher rates of suicide. Many Native American tribes prided themselves in their appearance, and the resulting skin disfigurement of smallpox deeply affected them psychologically. Unable to cope with this psychological development, tribe members were said to have committed suicide.[8]

    Native Americans first exposed to these diseases also had a unique approach to illness, relating primarily to religious beliefs. There is the belief that disease is caused by either a lack of charm use, an intrusion of an object by means of sorcery, or the free soul's absence from the body. Disease was understood to enter the body if one is not protected by the spirits, as it is a natural occurrence. Religious powers were believed to be related to curing diseases as well.[9] Native American illness has been treated through the practice of shamanism in the past, though this decreased as the influence of Europeans increased.

    Disease as a potential weapon against Native Americans

    "You will do well to try to inoculate the Indians, by means of blankets, as well as to try every other method that can serve to extirpate this execrable race." — Jeffery Amherst [10]
    The spread of disease from European contact may not have always been accidental. Europeans who were arriving in the Americas had already been exposed to the diseases, attaining immunity, and thus were not affected by them. Therefore, it could be an effective technique to use disease as a biological weapon when others were exhausted.[10]

    There is only one documented instance in which disease was proposed to be used as a weapon against Native American tribes. During the French and Indian War, Jeffery Amherst, 1st Baron Amherst, Britain's commander in chief in North America suggested using the smallpox disease to wipe out their Native American enemy. It is quoted from his writings to Colonel Henry Bouquet concerning the situation in western Pennsylvania[10] that the spread of disease would be beneficial to achieve their means and Bouquet confirmed his intentions to do so.

    Dissent to the biological weapon theory

    There is current scholarly dissent to the theory that the outbreaks of smallpox may have been aided by the intentional spreading of disease. Allegations of smallpox-infested blankets being intentionally given to Native Americans in 1763 at the Siege of Fort Pitt were proved false.[11] The outbreaks that occurred specifically in this region may have resulted from sporadic cases already occurring amongst Indians rather than from this scenario.[10] Historians also say that though blankets containing smallpox may have been distributed to Native Americans by the Europeans, they may have been given with good will and intentions, instead of for the purpose of disseminating disease. Additionally, scholars such as Gregory Dowd, are of the opinion that disease was spread by Native Americans returning from battling infected Europeans. Therefore it may have been carried by Native Americans to their own people and spread.[12]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_..._and_epidemics
    Aslan 11/1/90 - 6/15/10 Stormy 1/22/95 -8/23/10
    “There are not one hundred people in the United States who hate The Catholic Church,
    but there are millions who hate what they wrongly perceive the Catholic Church to be.”
    Bishop Fulton J. Sheen

    “It takes a very long time to become young.” Pablo Picasso

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by aslan View Post
    There is only one documented instance in which disease was proposed to be used as a weapon against Native American tribes. During the French and Indian War, Jeffery Amherst, 1st Baron Amherst, Britain's commander in chief in North America suggested using the smallpox disease to wipe out their Native American enemy. It is quoted from his writings to Colonel Henry Bouquet concerning the situation in western Pennsylvania[10] that the spread of disease would be beneficial to achieve their means and Bouquet confirmed his intentions to do so.
    From the Cherokee Registry, a "smoking letter" ...

    In 1738, a major disaster struck the Cherokee when their towns were swept by an epidemic of smallpox. The Cherokee Chief Oconostota, accused the British of deliberately planting smallpox germs in the trade goods, they had shipped to the Cherokees.

    The desire of Whites to occupy Indian lands, and the rivalry between French and English for control of the fur trade conducted through Indians, led to the French and Indian War of 1763. In the summer of 1763, attacks by Native Americans against colonists on the western frontier seriously challenged British military control. Lord Jeffery Amherst (who commanded the British military forces stationed in North American during this time), discussed with his troops the advantages of hunting down Indians with dogs, versus infecting them with smallpox.

    In a letter to Colonel Henry Bouquet dated July 7, 1763, Amherst writes "Could it not be contrived to send the Small Pox among those disaffected tribes of Indians?" In a later letter to Bouquet Amherst repeats the idea: "You will do well to try to inoculate the Indians by means of blankets, as well as to try every other method that can serve to extirpate this execrable race."

    "The dogs bark but the caravan moves on."
    .....................The Zengrifter Interview (PDF) |
    The Zengrifter / James Grosjean Reputation Debate
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    “Truth, like gold, is obtained not by growth, but by washing away all that is not gold.” — Leo Tolstoy........
    "Is everything a conspiracy? No, just the important stuff." ZG

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    Quote Originally Posted by zengrifter View Post
    From the Cherokee Registry, a "smoking letter" ...

    In 1738, a major disaster struck the Cherokee when their towns were swept by an epidemic of smallpox. The Cherokee Chief Oconostota, accused the British of deliberately planting smallpox germs in the trade goods, they had shipped to the Cherokees.

    The desire of Whites to occupy Indian lands, and the rivalry between French and English for control of the fur trade conducted through Indians, led to the French and Indian War of 1763. In the summer of 1763, attacks by Native Americans against colonists on the western frontier seriously challenged British military control. Lord Jeffery Amherst (who commanded the British military forces stationed in North American during this time), discussed with his troops the advantages of hunting down Indians with dogs, versus infecting them with smallpox.

    In a letter to Colonel Henry Bouquet dated July 7, 1763, Amherst writes "Could it not be contrived to send the Small Pox among those disaffected tribes of Indians?" In a later letter to Bouquet Amherst repeats the idea: "You will do well to try to inoculate the Indians by means of blankets, as well as to try every other method that can serve to extirpate this execrable race."

    Aren't you repeating what I posted? And if evil men did so, it was a heinous act on their part.
    Aslan 11/1/90 - 6/15/10 Stormy 1/22/95 -8/23/10
    “There are not one hundred people in the United States who hate The Catholic Church,
    but there are millions who hate what they wrongly perceive the Catholic Church to be.”
    Bishop Fulton J. Sheen

    “It takes a very long time to become young.” Pablo Picasso

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by aslan View Post
    Aren't you repeating what I posted?
    Yes, but I found the letter.
    Smoking gun evidence may not exist in other similar outcomes, but this sort of bio-warfare occurred numerous times.
    "The dogs bark but the caravan moves on."
    .....................The Zengrifter Interview (PDF) |
    The Zengrifter / James Grosjean Reputation Debate
    -----------------------------------------
    “Truth, like gold, is obtained not by growth, but by washing away all that is not gold.” — Leo Tolstoy........
    "Is everything a conspiracy? No, just the important stuff." ZG

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    Quote Originally Posted by zengrifter View Post
    Yes, but I found the letter.
    Smoking gun evidence may not exist in other similar outcomes, but this sort of bio-warfare occurred numerous times.
    You have no right, evidence or authority to make such a statement. Please stick to the facts. Even in the one you cited there is no ironclad proof (what you quoted is in dispute) that the man was ever able to carry out his evil thought. To the extent that any such thing happened I condemn such actions as worthy of eternal damnation. It is unconscionable. I also submit that this man and others like him, if they existed, do not constitute the United States of America, but acted on their own evil accord. I sorrow for the death of every indigenous American no matter whether it was accidental by European carriers of disease, or whether it was deliberate by warfare or deliberate spreading of disease.

    As an American, I can testify that we still have a culture of death to this very day in (1) abortion, which is the snuffing out of a precious human life in the womb and for which we are responsible for well over 50,000,000 since the passage of Roe v. Wade, (2) capital punishment, which no longer has a moral leg to stand on since our technology can now ensure the criminal can be kept safely away from the possibility of ever again committing a crime against society and humanity, except maybe suicide, (3) wars not justified by the need to defend the nation or an allied nation from the imminent and deadly threat of their enemies, (4) the widespread use of drugs, which are a destructive force unleashed against a person's own body and soul, and which exacerbate numerous other crimes and immoralities that are part and parcel with it, (5) secularism and materialism, which are the dying gasps of a society that has turned its back on God and has given itself over to a death by denial of the purpose for which a human being is born into the world, that purpose being to love and serve His Creator and to love and serve His fellow man.

    There is a good element in this country, and it is my belief that it is they that have kept the country from imploding. I pray for a leader, I don't see him now, who will galvanize our spirits to pursue the great ideals that our forefathers set before us and which can save us from an untimely death. It only takes one spark to ignite a great fire. With the right leadership, and with the willing labor and sacrifices of our people, we can become a nation that brings hope to ourselves and to the world. It only takes one spark. It only takes each one of us pulling together. It takes a country of families wedded to an ideal, not a state of individuals each seeking his own personal power,wealth and gratification. I believe that every American who posts on this site is one of those persons who wants America to right itself and to begin acting as a country should, even if some have given up hope that it can happen. For the simple reason that so many here see what's wrong, I cannot help but believe that each of us would seize the chance to make a difference if we had the opportunity. The more people who are like us, the more chance we have to make that difference. It only takes one spark to ignite a great fire and maybe someone reading this post is that spark.
    Aslan 11/1/90 - 6/15/10 Stormy 1/22/95 -8/23/10
    “There are not one hundred people in the United States who hate The Catholic Church,
    but there are millions who hate what they wrongly perceive the Catholic Church to be.”
    Bishop Fulton J. Sheen

    “It takes a very long time to become young.” Pablo Picasso

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by zengrifter View Post
    Yes, but I found the letter.
    Smoking gun evidence may not exist in other similar outcomes, but this sort of bio-warfare occurred numerous times.
    Quote Originally Posted by aslan View Post
    You have no right, evidence or authority to make such a statement. Please stick to the facts.
    Sure I do. Native American genocide in it's many forms is a fact, with or without calculated smallpox.
    Evidence for calculated smallpox infection of indigenous Americans does exist, though we cannot expect to find factual documented evidence at every turn
    because actions were kept shrouded. Notwithstanding, a little bit of Googling reveals more evidence that purposeful infection was a not-unknown tactic ...

    Last edited by zengrifter; August 18th, 2014 at 02:43 AM.
    "The dogs bark but the caravan moves on."
    .....................The Zengrifter Interview (PDF) |
    The Zengrifter / James Grosjean Reputation Debate
    -----------------------------------------
    “Truth, like gold, is obtained not by growth, but by washing away all that is not gold.” — Leo Tolstoy........
    "Is everything a conspiracy? No, just the important stuff." ZG

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    Quote Originally Posted by zengrifter View Post
    Sure I do. Native American genocide in it's many forms is a fact, with or without calculated smallpox.
    Evidence for calculated smallpox infection of indigenous Americans does exist, though we cannot expect to find factual documented evidence at every turn
    because actions were kept shrouded. Notwithstanding, a little bit of Googling reveals more evidence that purposeful infection was a not-unknown tactic ...

    I insist you don't.

    The preponderance of evidence is that most of the diseases that spread among the indigenous Americans were inadvertently spread through contact with infected settlers or their effects and not as a deliberate plan of genocide. That at least one man proposed doing so, and may or may not have in fact done so, and the possibility that others may or may not have, does not add up to a deliberate plan of genocide in the vast majority of cases. Also, smallpox was not the only disease that killed millions of indigenous peoples in both North and South America. For the most part I do not agree with its being a deliberate plan of genocide. It can still be called genocide if inadvertent, but not in the sense of criminal culpability. In any event, it was a sad, sad event in the history of the planet.
    Aslan 11/1/90 - 6/15/10 Stormy 1/22/95 -8/23/10
    “There are not one hundred people in the United States who hate The Catholic Church,
    but there are millions who hate what they wrongly perceive the Catholic Church to be.”
    Bishop Fulton J. Sheen

    “It takes a very long time to become young.” Pablo Picasso

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